Hampton U. Scripps Howard School 10th Anniversary celebration

By DaReinn Stevens

HAMPTON, Va. – On Thursday, the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications will celebrate its 10th Anniversary. Many students, faculty and distinguished guests are eagerly anticipating this commemorative event.

Professor Allie-Ryan Butler, co-event coordinator for the event, has been working diligently to make sure the celebration and evening gala go smoothly. With help from the students and others, Butler has planned an event that is expected to bring money into the school for student scholarships.

Butler has been charged with selecting and furnishing the location and ensuring all guests who attend the fund raiser enjoy the evening festivities.

Students and faculty will be in attendance, and professors have canceled classes so that students are able to attend the various workshops and seminars held throughout the day.

"I hope that we will continue to raise the bar to focus on our digital media initiative to continue to foster the creative genius in our students," said Butler, "and to not only become the best black school of journalism and communications but the best school in journalism and communications."

The gala will be held from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. on the 14th floor of the Hampton University Harbour Centre, located at 2 Eaton St. Tickets for this event are available for $150 each and can be purchased online.

The writer is a student at the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

Town-hall debate churned smoke, not fire, said HU viewers

By Maulana Moore

HAMPTON, Va. – Education and jobs were issues that college students at Hampton University were looking to see addressed during the second presidential debate on Tuesday.

This time, President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney went head to head in a town-hall style setting, answering questions from an audience of undecided voters at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

"I did not like the town-hall style at all," said Domanique Jordan, a broadcast journalism major from Fort Washington, Md. "It seemed like the questions were rehearsed or planted in the crowd."

She was focused on jobs for future graduates and the cost of tuition.

"If college is expensive, degrees won't be given," said Jordan. "No degree, no job."

The debate was characterized by both candidates challenging each other on hot-button issues in more of a conversational dialogue than in the first presidential debate.

Shauntell Myles, 24, and a chemistry graduate student from Petersburg, Va., said while the dialogue was more aggressive and engaging, she didn't get anything from the debate.

"I feel like if you really wanted to know who to vote for, you'd have to do it on your own," Myles said. "These debates aren't helping."

Hampton University held its second presidential debate watch party, which attracted about 100 students, about half the size of the overflow crowd Oct. 3 inside the Student Center Theatre.

At the same time, a watch party – open to the public – was held in downtown Hampton at the Crowne Plaza hotel.

"Many of the movers and shakers of Hampton were there including Rep. Bobby Scott, news crews, judges and HU professors," said Destiny Durant, a senior marketing major from Springfield, Va. and Crowne Plaza hotel employee. "Everyone was cheering for Obama."

As the third and final presidential debate Oct. 22 nears, Election Day does, too.

The candidates have 18 days to win over those key, undecided voters.

The writer is a junior in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

Foreign embassy, call center or truck, it is summer work

Summer employment took some Scripps Howard School of JAC student to the American heartland, or out of the country to South America. Here are three vignettes.

By P.J. Bolling

Hampton University broadcast journalism major Lane Grooms interned this summer at the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana.

"I was ecstatic when I learned will be going down to South America to do an internship," said Grooms, "but at the same time I was a little nervous about going outside the country."

Not only did he have to worry about leaving the country, but Grooms quickly had to get acclimated to the extremely hot weather.

"Guyana is very, very humid," said the future journalist. "I got off the plane sweating." The average summer high temperature in Guyana was 86 degrees.

Grooms, a junior, said that he had to drive on the opposite side of the road: "It took a few days to get used to."

On top of going out of the country, getting acclimated to the humidity and driving on the opposite side of the street, Grooms expressed his discomfort with the native music called soca, which is a blend of reggae, hip-hop, and R&B music. "It was audibly displeasing," he said.

However, during his stay Grooms enjoyed exotic fruit such as lime-like genips and passionate fruit.

"It was surprisingly pretty good," he said.

At the embassy, Grooms had to communicate with Caribbean-speaking people as well as English speaking folk. One of the Caribbean speaking people he met was Prime Minister Samuel Hines.

"He was down to earth and had a sense of humor even though we had a little trouble understanding each other," said Grooms.

The internship lasted from June until August. Grooms said that working for the embassy taught him more discipline. "It was a government job, so I had to get serious," he said. "It taught me order. That's something that I took back with me to the states."

***

By Lane Grooms

This summer P.J. Bolling was loading and unloading boxes and packages from UPS trucks. Bolling worked the 1 to 5 p.m. second shift in greater Cincinnati.

Working during the hottest part of day in 100-degree-plus weather has its perks though, he said: "They gave us water, candy and watermelon every Wednesday, and I was sometimes let off early."

Bolling said it took a while for him to get acclimated to his new work environment. However, he had ample time to adjust because he began his workdays in mid-June and worked all the way until it was time to go back to school in late August.

My best day at work was my first day on the job," said Bolling, "because it was relaxed and they gave me Gatorade."

Because of the harsh conditions of loading and unloading trucks for four straight hours each day, Bolling explained, "I have a lot of new scars." He said on his worst day of work, "I unloaded three trucks back to back in 105-degree weather with no break."

When asked what he will miss most about the job, Bolling answered, "making money."

***

By Porchia Bradford

For Hampton University's Brazier Bryant, hard work continued after the fall and spring semesters. In her hometown, Omaha, Neb., Bryant went straight to work.

Bryant's summer work began at the Allergy Relief Center. She was a representative in the call center, where medical surveys were conducted. Her time at the center was short lived. She described her duties as "boring." After two weeks, Bryant resigned.

Direct TV hired Bryant right away. She began in the NFL department, working directly with the customers. Her duties included service calls, promotions and bonuses.

During her tenure at Direct TV, Viacom's contract expired. Viacom is the network responsible for popular TV channels such as BET, MTV and Nickelodeon.

Customers directed their anger at Bryant, she said: "One lady threatened to sue me because she thought I took her channels away." She had to remind people that she was just a representative for Direct TV and had no control over the company contracts. This experience taught her to exercise patience and tranquility.

As summer came to a close, so did Bryant's job at Direct TV.

Foreign embassy, call center or truck, it is summer work

Summer employment took some Scripps Howard School of JAC student to the American heartland, or out of the country to South America. Here are three vignettes.

By P.J. Bolling

Hampton University broadcast journalism major Lane Grooms interned this summer at the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana.

"I was ecstatic when I learned will be going down to South America to do an internship," said Grooms, "but at the same time I was a little nervous about going outside the country."

Not only did he have to worry about leaving the country, but Grooms quickly had to get acclimated to the extremely hot weather.

"Guyana is very, very humid," said the future journalist. "I got off the plane sweating." The average summer high temperature in Guyana was 86 degrees.

Grooms, a junior, said that he had to drive on the opposite side of the road: "It took a few days to get used to."

On top of going out of the country, getting acclimated to the humidity and driving on the opposite side of the street, Grooms expressed his discomfort with the native music called soca, which is a blend of reggae, hip-hop, and R&B music. "It was audibly displeasing," he said.

However, during his stay Grooms enjoyed exotic fruit such as lime-like genips and passionate fruit.

"It was surprisingly pretty good," he said.

At the embassy, Grooms had to communicate with Caribbean-speaking people as well as English speaking folk. One of the Caribbean speaking people he met was Prime Minister Samuel Hines.

"He was down to earth and had a sense of humor even though we had a little trouble understanding each other," said Grooms.

The internship lasted from June until August. Grooms said that working for the embassy taught him more discipline. "It was a government job, so I had to get serious," he said. "It taught me order. That's something that I took back with me to the states."

***

By Lane Grooms

This summer P.J. Bolling was loading and unloading boxes and packages from UPS trucks. Bolling worked the 1 to 5 p.m. second shift in greater Cincinnati.

Working during the hottest part of day in 100-degree-plus weather has its perks though, he said: "They gave us water, candy and watermelon every Wednesday, and I was sometimes let off early."

Bolling said it took a while for him to get acclimated to his new work environment. However, he had ample time to adjust because he began his workdays in mid-June and worked all the way until it was time to go back to school in late August.

My best day at work was my first day on the job," said Bolling, "because it was relaxed and they gave me Gatorade."

Because of the harsh conditions of loading and unloading trucks for four straight hours each day, Bolling explained, "I have a lot of new scars." He said on his worst day of work, "I unloaded three trucks back to back in 105-degree weather with no break."

When asked what he will miss most about the job, Bolling answered, "making money."

***

By Porchia Bradford

For Hampton University's Brazier Bryant, hard work continued after the fall and spring semesters. In her hometown, Omaha, Neb., Bryant went straight to work.

Bryant's summer work began at the Allergy Relief Center. She was a representative in the call center, where medical surveys were conducted. Her time at the center was short lived. She described her duties as "boring." After two weeks, Bryant resigned.

Direct TV hired Bryant right away. She began in the NFL department, working directly with the customers. Her duties included service calls, promotions and bonuses.

During her tenure at Direct TV, Viacom's contract expired. Viacom is the network responsible for popular TV channels such as BET, MTV and Nickelodeon.

Customers directed their anger at Bryant, she said: "One lady threatened to sue me because she thought I took her channels away." She had to remind people that she was just a representative for Direct TV and had no control over the company contracts. This experience taught her to exercise patience and tranquility.

As summer came to a close, so did Bryant's job at Direct TV.

Hampton U. cleans up for High School Day

By Antoinique Abraham

As the flowers bloom and the temperature rises, Hampton University begins preparation for one of the biggest events of the year. On Friday, April 6, The Office of Admissions will host its 34th annual High School Day.

High School Day is designed to give potential students a preview of collegiate life, both academically and socially. About 240 student leader representatives will be available throughout the day to provide information and to answer questions.

The Student Recruitment Team plays an active role in giving prospective students the opportunity to experience Hampton U. Throughout the week they have rehearsed chants and songs that will get high school students excited about admission and attending Hampton.

"We've been working extremely hard and I'm excited about participating in High School Day with the Student Recruitment Team," said Courtney Smith, a sophomore computer science major.

There are many changes being made around campus in preparation of this event including, wet paint signs on walls and stairwells around campus, and the speedy construction of the new cafeteria. Maintenance workers and contractors were working hard to ensure that the university will be in tip-top shape by Friday.

Some students believe this day is just a façade; that Hampton puts on a show to impress and win over the hearts of undecided parents and students.

"I am proud to represent my school," said Tatyana Miller, a sophomore English Education major, "but there should be some consistency in the way that things are represented on High School Day."

Other students, like Devin Wynne, sophomore computer science major, encourage the concept of High School Day: "It is important for students as well as faculty to represent Hampton University in a positive light."

All high school students are invited to visit Hampton University for High School Day.

On-campus activities that day will include guided tours, an outdoor soundstage, an Administrative/Student Activities fair, and a Blue- and- White football game. Attendees will be entertained by The Force marching band, the Terpsichorean Dance Company, and the Hampton University choir.

Open houses hosted by deans will take place in all of the academic buildings, nine schools on campus.

The writer is a student at the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

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