Wild night in at HU’s Wylin’ Out

Photo Credit: Kayla Smith

By Kayla Smith | Staff Writer

Hampton students crowded the Student Center Atrium Oct. 23 to watch Hampton's very own alumna Chelsea Raye host "Wylin' Out," HU's spin on Nick Cannon's "Wild n' Out."

Every floor of the building was packed to watch the Blue Squad battle the Black Squad in competition for who could make the audience laugh the most.

There were multiple rounds to the night, with each round covering a different topic that kept the audience laughing. Segments ranged from a family reunion round that sent teams out into the crowd to pick an unsuspecting audience member to an impersonation round that had team members doing their best imitation of whatever the theme was. The stage was set, and the rules for the rounds were placed. Witty, and sometimes even personal, jokes were exchanged back and forth between teams and sometimes even against actual audience members. For two hours, teams did not back down.

The groups' approaches were also very important to winning over the audience on this night. It was still a competition between the two, and whoever had a combination of the most dings from DJ Vince and the most reaction from the crowd won that specific round.

For the rest of the article head to The Hampton Script.

Homecoming fashion show: “For the Culture”

Photo Credit: Taylor Gravesande

By Shadae Simpson | Staff Writer

Another Homecoming Fashion Show is in the books after last week's "For the Culture" show put on by the students of Hampton University. Students, parents and staff all gathered in the Student Center Ballroom to see this annual show Oct. 22.

Although the show seemed effortlessly put together, teams worked for more than a month, enduring long practices, to ensure they put on the best possible show that they could, which means that sometimes practices ran until 2 a.m. However, all the late hours and hard work paid off, because every model presented a sharp performance and artfully presented the brands for which they were modeling.

"The show was a lot of fun!" said HU student Andrew Wilborn, a senior journalism major from Virginia. "It took a lot of hard work and practicing, but I couldn't have asked for a better second-to-last show of my college career."

It was clear that the directors and designers had a clear vision of how they wanted the show to turn out, and it is safe to say that their vision was brought to fruition that night. Everything was clean and precise from the opening of the show when the first model walked down the runway to the final flood. The crowd reciprocated the model's energy which made for an even more successful event.

For the rest of the article head to The Hampton Script.

Da Baby takes over da real HU

Photo Credit: Tyla Barnes

By Andi McCloud | Staff Writer

More than 1,000 Hampton University students and Hampton Roads residents Oct. 26 piled into the HU Convocation Center to kick off the HU Homecoming weekend with the annual Homecoming Concert. Da Baby, along with Hampton University's best talent, performed at this year's concert and gave Onyx 11 perhaps the greatest concert in their tenure at Hampton. Since the arrival of Onyx 11, this class has made it their duty to leave a mark on Hamptons University's campus.

"With our homecoming theme being 'A Different Homecoming,' ode to the show 'A Different World,' said to be inspired by the college life here at Hampton, this year had to be special," Hampton University senior Nyla Whyte said.

Even the opening acts gave Hampton a different show. Through diverse performances including an R&B duet KaEl & Heather featuring trumpeteer DeAndre Smith-Brown and a father/son rap duo Big Rick & Lil Rick, the crowd partied in the Convocation Center waiting for the main act.

For the rest of the article head to The Hampton Script.

Pepsi and Essence host star-studded tailgate; Kicks off HBCU initiative

Photo Credit: Hampton Athletic Marketing

By Leenika Belfield-Martin | Lifestyle Editor

Pepsi and Essence joined forces to bring students and alumni the ultimate tailgate experience with guest appearances from Kash Doll, Rotimi, D.J. Envy and more on October 26. This event kicks off the launch of their initiative celebrating black women called "She Got Now."

"Homecoming is a special time for us and to have two power house brands like Pepsi and ESSENCE on campus recruiting, supporting and honoring the young Black women we develop here at Hampton, is phenomenal," said President Dr. William R. Harvey in a university press release.

From noon to seven at night the lawn behind Martin Luther King Hall was transformed into an outdoor stage accompanied with various tents from alumni groups, Bumble, Pepsi and Essence.

Media personalities Scottie Beam and Gia Peppers lead the crowd in various activities like a "Hampton's got talent" competition, a Beyonce dance-off, and the HBCU staple swag surf. Both returning Hamptonians and current students were impressed by the event.

For the rest of the article head to The Hampton Script.

University Career Fair

By Kayla Smith

Dozens of motivated Hampton students gathered Sept. 26 in the Convocation Center for the University Career Fair with the hope of creating connections that could secure their futures.

With more than 100 tables of representatives from major corporations such as Bank of America to school districts from Georgia, students mingled with eager employers. Hampton has always been a huge advocate for preparing its students for success, and this career fair was an excellent opportunity for both the students and recruiters.

The University Career Fair is a way for students to be able to network with representatives from companies and create relationships. With increasingly competitive markets around the country, this type of exposure is crucial to build up one's experience in professional settings. By enforcing a strict business professional attire, this provides students with real-life readiness for when they enter the industry.

For more on this story, read the Oct. 4 issue of The Hampton Script or visit HamptonScript.com.

Disney Comes to HU for Presentations and Networking Opportunities

DISNEY DAYS!

Disney corporate recruiter Khalifah Nailor and Walt Disney Television senior recruiter Kim Surabian will visit the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications on Wednesday, Oct. 2, and Thursday, Oct. 3.

There will be presentations and networking opportunities. There will be no formal interviews during this visit.

Here is the schedule of events:

Wednesday, Oct. 2

4-5:30 p.m. Campus-wide presentation, Scripps Auditorium. The focus will be professional internship offerings within The Walt Disney Company and the application process.

Thursday, Oct. 3

9-10:30 a.m. Disney team visits School of Business.
10:30-11 a.m. Break.
11 a.m. Disney Senior Capstone and Junior Presentation, Scripps Auditorium. For Dr. DiBari's and Prof. Reynolds' Senior Capstone class and juniors. The focus will be the Disney Hospitality Leadership Program, application and interview tips.
Noon Lunch break.
1-2:30 p.m. Disney Freshman and Sophomore Presentation, Scripps Auditorium. For Prof. Woodard's JAC 105 class and others. The focus will be professional development.
2:30-3 p.m. Break.
3-4 p.m. Disney team recruiters and professionals network with students. Open to all majors and levels. Scripps Atrium.

Download the below flyer here.

Passion and Diligence are Keys to Success

By Asia Rollins

HAMPTON, VA - A CBS News National Correspondent must deliver deliver accurate, meaningful news to gain the trust of viewers. For a black woman, the journey to being in front of the camera is very hard work.

Jericka Duncan told students at Hampton University on April 12 that her ability to effortlessly deliver news may look easy, but it requires a combination of passion and diligence, especially when life gets hard.

Duncan was the keynote speaker for The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) 2019 Region 1 Conference at Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

"When you find your passion you don't really look at it as a job," said the CBS News correspondent. "You want to get up in the morning."

Duncan's struggle and desire to be a face of representation for other African Americans inspire her, she said. Being in that role pushes her to do her best every day.

"You have to be focused and not let little things get in the way of what you desire," Duncan said.

Duncan's style of delivering news has allowed her to make a name for herself. While reporting, she likes to keep things simple. Duncan believes that truth, accuracy and multiple perspectives are keys to a great story.

Her ability to serve as a role model to younger aspiring students encouraged students at Hampton.

"One of the most inspirational things that Jericka said was being in the place and leading by example," said student Jordan Carter.

Duncan told students it is important for people of color to be represented in the newsroom and attain positions of power.

"There aren't many African- American journalists on the forefront of broadcast," said student Jaylen Harris. "There needs to be a change and I hope to do that in the future."

Family is Everything to KTAs

By Kennedi Jackson

Family will always support you, even when no one else does.

That was the key message for top communications scholars Friday during the induction ceremony into Kappa Tau Alpha (KTA) at the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

Your family "has the biggest part in getting you here," said Dr. Michael DiBari, a photography and visual arts professor who also teaches Senior Capstone.

DeBari was the keynote speaker at the induction into the nation's premier honor society.

The society invites only the top ten percent of junior and seniors. Some family members attended to support students.

"If I could impart anything, it's to remember your family and do good work," said DiBari who was inducted into KTA as a graduate student.

Dibari spoke of his own personal experience with winning a high school wrestling competition, and the significance of having your family recognize your achievements.

After the speech, students were presented with their certificates, pins, membership cards and honor cords, then said the KTA pledge in unison.

Afterward, students swarmed for pictures with their friends while cake was cut in the back of the room. Students said they were pleased to have an extra distinction on their resumes.

The atmosphere in the room was as expected of students receiving such an honorable distinction. Smiles could be seen all around the room. There was a small turnout of family and friends, but the ones who did come definitely made it known that they were there. They whooped when names were called to show how proud they were.

Kappa Tau Alpha is the college honor society that recognizes academic excellence and promotes scholarship in journalism and mass communications. Members are selected based on these qualifications. It is the seventh national honor society, founded at the University of Missouri in 1910. Their symbol is the key, a symbol for knowledge and communication. The organization continues on with new members here at our home by the sea, leading journalistic excellence for years to come.

1619-2019: SANKOFA!

On March 30 at 5 p.m., the Peninsula Fine Arts Center presents "Imagine Isabella," a live performance representing the spirit of an Angolan Slave girl from 400 years ago and a panel discussion of the exhibit of sculptures called "Cash Crop," which closes March 31.

By Lea Luellen

Hampton VA-- Sankofa is a Ghanaian word meaning "look to your past to guide your future." The Peninsula Fine Arts Center in Newport News is asking visitors to do just that. "African Art: Power and Identity," which opened January 18 and runs through April 28, includes sculptures, paintings, textiles, masks, and jewelry. The central exhibit, "Cash Crop," by sculptor and artist Stephen Hayes, reveals the power of the African Diaspora, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and its lingering effects over the past 400 years. ."

Hayes is a mixed media creator from Durham, North Carolina and a professor at Duke University where he teaches Art, Art History, and Visual Studies.

Though the statues have been called "graphic" by some, Hayes said the images represent a reality viewers need to grapple with

"The question is, what's too graphic for learning? It's about the transporting of people as goods and commodity and connecting it back to today and how we outsource our goods from one place to another, asking the question of who or what is the next cash crop. It's bringing a light to a past, and a light to a present," said Hayes during an interview after opening night at the fine arts center.

"Cash Crop" includes 15 life-sized statues that represent the estimated 15 million slaves brought to the colonies during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. The statues are bound with shackles from their necks to their feet. Their backs are each attached to a wooden board, which shows how bodies were packed during the slave journey, representing the treatment of slaves as goods and commodities instead of human beings. All 15 statues are connected to a large wooden pallet.

"The pallet represents today and how our goods come from these third world countries. The slave ship plan reminds me of a sweat shop in a third world country. If you take the roof off, it looks like they packed people inside with just enough room to produce as many goods as possible," said Hayes in an interview with The Guilfordian, the student newspaper for Guilford College.

Hampton students who attended the opening said they were affected by the exhibit.

"The piece itself showed years of progress from the entry as property to the current state as prosperous. I was emotionally involved by just looking at the chained necks of the sculptures...it made me feel like me, myself was in captivity," said Josiah-Belfon Valentine, a Hampton University student.

During the opening, Hayes wore locks past his shoulders with a T-shirt saying, "There is a King in all of us." He related his work to America today, to symbolize the evolution of slavery from 400 years ago to 2019.

"You see, this is what art is about, creating a rush of emotion in individuals that causes us to think and feel," said Julianna Sarr, owner of Elixir Art Gallery in Hampton, VA.

Sarr is a multimedia artist who will be Using Hayes' Cash Crop as a backdrop for her first performance art piece, "Imagine Isabella" at the arts center on March 31st. After the interactive performance art piece, a live panel will discuss the effects of African enslavement and diaspora on America today.

Hayes has been touring the 15-piece ensemble since 2010. Its permanent home is the National Museum of African American History and Culture in D.C. It will be on loan to the Peninsula Fine Arts Center until March 31st.

The larger exhibit that includes Hayes' work, entitled African Art: Power & Identity, is part of a region-wide celebration of the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first Africans. About twenty arrived at Point Comfort near Jamestown in 1619.

Opening Convocation speaker advises students to 'listen and learn'

HAMPTON, VA – Graduating seniors waited for their final Convocation Sunday at Hampton University. The weather, clear and sunny, seemed as bright as their futures.

When the school marshals finally gave the signal they marched in single file to Ogden Hall, the intimate auditorium that held so many memories.

There Hampton alumnus, healthcare pharmaceutical strategist and co-founder of #HamptonNation, Calvin L. Butts Jr. delivered his keynote address. Butts shared three points with students.

Hard work is never enough. Never settle and be comfortable. Always keep working, Butts said.

Butts has studied university president William R. Harvey's business tactics and advice, which has helped shape Butts to become the leader he is today. Butts was inducted last year to Hampton University's inaugural Alumni Forty Under 40 because of his continuous hard work and determination.

"The person next to you is working hard too. You must be creative and show the world that you are different," he told the students.

Although Butts urged students to work harder than the people around them, he also believes networking is just as important.

"Partnership can be valuable if you choose the right people, but you guys don't have to worry about that here at Hampton," Butts said.

Butts said he relied on those relationships in order to succeed after graduation. One of his many successful LLC's is profitable because he partnered with a former classmate who he viewed as friendly competition.

Butts chose to attend Hampton University because of the people he could meet here. He was convinced to attend after he saw his name on an envelope pasted on the window of the Administration building. When he opened it, he saw that he had been accepted and knew immediately he would accept.

Some seniors in the audience were inspired by Mr. Butts' success.

"One day I will own a real estate agency and hopefully deliver the keynote address at a opening convocation ceremony like Mr. Butts did earlier on today, " said senior finance major Gerald Campbell.

Finally, Butts urged students to listen and learn.

"Listen to your peers like you have to listen to your wife when she is speaking," Butts said. "If you find something you are good at, keep trying to be your best at it."

Some students took Butts' advice to heart.

"Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success," said graduate student Brandon Meekins.

The writer is a student in the Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications.

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