NBA honors Kobe Bryant with All-Star tributes on and off the court

Keion Cage | Hampton Script Staff Writer

The NBA's All-Star Game on Feb. 16 in Chicago celebrated some of the league's best athletes. The association also changed the rules of the game to honor basketball legend Kobe Bryant, who died Jan. 26.

A frenetic fourth quarter featured fierce competitiveness worthy of Bryant. Several fouls, challenges and heated disputes occurred between players and referees – rarely seen in past All-Star games.

"This fourth quarter of [the NBA All-Star Game] is an absolutely phenomenal look for the game of basketball," ESPN journalist Stephen A. Smith wrote on Twitter. "This is what fans crave and the players delivered."

Team LeBron was able to complete the comeback victory and beat Team Giannis, 157-155, with a free throw made by the Los Angeles Lakers' Anthony Davis sealing the deal.

The NBA changed the All-Star MVP Award name to the Kobe Bryant All-Star MVP Award. The Los Angeles Clippers' Kawhi Leonard earned the honor with 30 points, seven rebounds and four assists.

"It's very special," Leonard said in an interview with ESPN. "Words can't explain how happy I am to be able to put that trophy in my room and just be able to see Kobe's name on there."

Photo courtesy of IMDb.

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President Trump unveils 2021 budget with massive cuts to assistance programs

By Sara Avery | Hampton University Staff Writer

President Trump unveiled his 2021 budget that makes major cuts to safety net programs like Social Security and food stamps. The $4.8 trillion proposal also will affect certain federal student loan programs, increasing the amount of debt that borrowers will have over their lifetime, USA Today reported.

A program that forgives the remaining student debt of public service workers, such as teachers and firefighters, who have made on time payments for 10 years, will be terminated. This could result in over $52 billion worth of additional payments in the next decade.

The budget also would terminate government payments on the subsides of Stafford loans. These subsidies are the interest the government pays on loans while students are in school. This could result in $18 billion more for borrowers over the next decade.

Additionally, a grant that helped 1.7 million students in 2019 will be axed. The Trump administration believes that the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant replicates the Pell Grant, which helped 8.2 million students in 2019, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

"I believe that Trump's new budget plan is making it impossible for families with harder financial circumstances to send their children to college," HU sophomore Daelin Brown said.

Another change being made is the limit placed on how much parents of undergraduates can borrow from the federal government with the Parent PLUS loan. Currently, parents can borrow the full annual cost of attendance minus other financial aid their student receives per year. Under the 2021 budget, that would be restricted to only $26,500 to pay for their student's entire undergraduate education.

"That's totally reasonable," Sandy Baum, a fellow in the Center for Education, Data and Policy at the Urban Institute, told USA Today. "There's no reason why the federal government should lend such large amounts of money to parents who may have their lives ruined by it because they can't afford to repay it."

The budget also will include modifications of Social Security and Medicaid, even after the president promised several times during campaigning that he would not touch it. The budget plans to cut around $45 billion on Social Security Supplemental Income, a program aimed at helping disabled children and adults. It also plans to cut $844 billion in Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act over the next 10 years.

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Vice President Mike Pence visits Hampton University’s Proton Therapy Institute

By Ayanna Maxwell | Hampton Script Editor-In-Chief

Photo Credit: Glenn Knight

Vice President Mike Pence visited Hampton University's Proton Therapy Institute on Feb. 19 to engage with students, faculty and HUPTI treatment survivors.

According to a news release from HU's Office of University Relations, the visit was arranged with the intentions of "supporting the University's efforts in providing state-of-the-art cancer research and delivering cancer treatment to military veterans and their families."

With it being Black History Month, Pence's visit to such a prestigious historically black university was extremely timely. Vice President Pence has established a fervent relationship with Hampton University President Dr. William R. Harvey and even noted that President Harvey played a major role in the recently signed policy making federal funding for HBCUs permanent.

Photo Credit: Glenn Knight

"President Harvey has been a real champion of this administration, particularly for HBCUs," Pence said.

Vice President Pence and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos participated in a roundtable discussion with various campus leaders: SGA President Jonathan Mack, SGA Vice President Bruce Wilson, Junior Class President Oshae Moore, Student Representative to the Board of Trustees Kenneth Rioland III, Hampton Script Editor-in-Chief Ayanna Maxwell and Miss Student Nursing Association Ebony Johnson. Among students and faculty, Vice President of Administrative Services Dr. Barbara Inman, Senior Vice President Attorney Paul Harris, and Chancellor and Provost Dr. JoAnn Haybsert were present.

"We think Hampton represents the best of HBCUs."

––Vice President Mike Pence

The vice president engaged in a meaningful discussion about the current administration's plans for supporting HBCUs and increasing White House internship and study abroad opportunities for HBCU students.

"[The current administration has] increased HBCU funding by 17% in real dollars...and restored Pell Grants to being year-round," Pence said. "The Department of Education also provided more than $500 million in loans for capital financing."

DeVos also mentioned a new addition to the recent budget proposal, in which there is "a STEM initiative for HBCUs located in opportunity zones."

In regards to expanding White House internship opportunities, Pence plans to continue connecting with HBCUs in order to increase participation in White House internship programs. The current administration also plans to ensure that all students have access to the resources necessary to pursue an education abroad. "We are working to make college more affordable for all students, no matter where they come from," Sec. DeVos said.

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Hampton commit receives McDonald’s All-American nomination

By Amber Anderson | Hampton Script Staff Writer

The vision is clear and bright for Hampton University commit Victoria Davis, as she is one step closer to becoming a McDonald's All-American athlete. Davis is living out a dream of many high school athletes. Along with more than 900 other high school basketball players across the country, she has been nominated for the McDonald's All-American Game.

Photo Credit: @chapternextphotography via Instagram

The McDonald's All-American Game has maintained a reputation for a difficult selective process. The names of the athletes have to be submitted and approved by a wide variety of judges. They include high school coaches, high school athletic directors, high school principals and McDonald's All-American Games Selection Committee Members. What surprises people the most is there isn't a set number on the amount of the nominees throughout the country.

Once the voting committees cast their vote, 24 young women will have the opportunity to become a McDonald's All-American. If selected, she will be playing with some of the best of the best on April 1 at the Toyota Center in Houston.

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Same script, different cast: How mainstream award shows continuously snub Black artists

By Jordan Sheppard | Hampton Script Staff Writer

"For years we've allowed institutions that have never had our best interests to judge us, and that stops right now. I am officially starting a clock. Y'all got 365 days to get this together," said Diddy as he accepted the Clive Davis Icon Award, at Clive Davis' annual Pre-Grammy Gala.

Outraged by the treatment of black artists by the award show, the three-time Grammy winner threatened to boycott if the Recording Academy doesn't seek to make change within the next year.

Coming just days after the Recording Academy's former CEO and President, Deborah Dugan, had alleged that the Grammys' nomination system is rigged, the award show has begun to take a lot of heat.

Tyler, the Creator, who took home the trophy for Best Rap Album for his LP Igor, also had a few words on the treatment of black artists.

In a backstage interview, Tyler stated that while he was grateful for the award, he does not appreciate how the Grammys always place black artists in "rap or urban categories" no matter how "genre-bending" their records are.

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Hampton University SGA hosts second annual student-led town hall

By Allyson Edge | Hampton Script Staff Writer

The Hampton University Student Government Association on Feb. 29 hosted its second annual student-led town hall in the Student Center Ballroom.

Specifically, the event was led by the student body president, vice president, student representative to the Board of Trustees and each class president. The idea of the student-led town hall serves as an open dialogue between SGA and the students whom they represent.

Throughout the event, students had the opportunity to come up to the microphone and pose inquiries or make suggestions. Members of the student government requested that students in the audience be transparent and utilize this platform to communicate in a respectful manner. Some of the concerns raised by students included: fire safety within certain buildings; student parking, specifically in the lots in between White and Holmes Hall; 24-hour co-ed study areas; adequate resident assistant compensation; gourmet bucks increase; and modernization of the business professional dress code, especially for women. Students also proposed making a printer available in each resident hall and having dorm fees applied to printer supplies.

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